Find a good place to paint plein air paint

When you find a good place to paint plein air you want to continue to return to it. To discover all the vista will yield. I am particularly enjoying the play of colors on the structures. Painting from the shadow side gives a more interesting play of shapes.

Lost but not forgotten, 9 x 12, oil on panel

Morning Sun, 9 x 12, oil on panel

 

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Information on Workshops & Locations
© 2012 Daryl Urig

It is nice to meet interesting people when you travel.

It was on my last visit to Bluffton South Carolina that I met Annelore Harrell while I was painting a painting on the May River. She commented on my painting and offered some suggestions on other places that may interest me. On my next visit, I took up her offer to show me these locations.

She was such a delight and helped me to unravel the picturesque mystery of the historic Bluffton SC area in a rather short amount of time. I was unaware that there was an area referred to as Old Bluffton and that Myrtle Island was part of this area, developed as early as the 1940’s. So many picture and painting possibilities, but you need to know where to look.

Additionally, I want to thank all of the gracious people I have met through my workshop in Bluffton SC, through SOBA (Society of Bluffton Artists), I can not thank you all for how kind you have been.


Look to see some of these paintings in future posts.

My next workshop:

Nov 19 & 20, 2011 – 2 Day Workshop
Day One: Plein-Air Figure at Penn Center (Historic Gullah Setting)
Day Two: Seascape Plein-Air Painting
Red Piano Too
, 870 Sea Island Parkway, St. Helena Island, SC
Details: http://www.darylurig.com/workshops-and-learning.aspx

 

Information on Workshops & Locations
YouTube Video:
Self-Portrait: http://youtu.be/5DDJ0TwPGz0
Painting Knives: adminPosted on Categories Daily Painter, Oil Paintings for Sale, plein airTags , , , , , , , , , , , , , 2 Comments on It is nice to meet interesting people when you travel.

Daughter of the Light

Being an American Artist, allows me to use my work to reflect on my upbringing in the heartland of American farming: Avon, Ohio.

Religion was important with my upbringing. It was not always completely understood or upheld, but there was a wholesome thread of Christianity.

The fears and hope of being a Christian gripped me. I believed in a strong sense of right and wrong, though like most Christians, failed in my human form to uphold it. But I always had a strong sense that Christianity was there and very real.

This painting depicts American architecture and religion beautifully. There is something intangible said in this image. Even when covered or hidden by human tradition, belief in God is always real.

Daughter of the light, 16 x 12 inches, oil on canvas

© 2010 Daryl Urig, All Rights Reserved

Visit the Paintings of Daryl Urig Online Gallery Store: http://www.darylurig.com/store.html

To view more paintings:
Website: http://DarylUrig.com
Blog:  http://DarylUrig.com/blog

Enlist Urig for your next Historic Event Painting: http://www.darylurig.com/historic-event-oil-painting.aspx

Purchase:
Price: Contact: Robyn@DarylUrig.com

View Exhibits and Awards: click here

Subscribe to Urig’s Blog: “The Adventure of an American Oil Painter” Blog by Email

More on Daryl Urig:

Interview & Bio: http://www.darylurig.com/about-daryl-urig.aspx

American Oil Painter Daryl Urig is a member of The Portrait Society of America, Oil Painters of America and Cincinnati Art Club. He has teaches at the University of Cincinnati for over 9 years and is president of Total Media Source Inc.

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Made in America

We have heard these words many times. They stir up patriotic sentiments whenever I hear them.

But today, most American goods come from overseas (whether from international or American companies). Obviously, it’s easier to produce a large number of manufactured goods abroad. But I can’t help but think how detrimental America’s mass importation has become.

I think about jobs going overseas, and the impact it has on American employment. It seems unfair that work Americans could enjoy in the states to support their families is going elsewhere.

Unlike unemployed Americans, I find myself very lucky. I enjoy the things I have, and I appreciate my ability to paint things that conjure up old childhood memories. I like that my painting cannot be controlled by the flailing economy. And I like to provide collectors with something personal and American made with my own hands. I hope that all of my readers can find something similar!

© 2010 Daryl Urig, All Rights Reserved

Visit the Paintings of Daryl Urig Online Gallery Store: http://www.darylurig.com/store.html

To view more paintings:
Website: http://DarylUrig.com
Blog:  http://DarylUrig.com/blog

Enlist Urig for your next Historic Event Painting: http://www.darylurig.com/historic-event-oil-painting.aspx

Purchase:
Price: Contact: Robyn@DarylUrig.com

View Exhibits and Awards: click here

Subscribe to Urig’s Blog: “The Adventure of an American Oil Painter” Blog by Email

More on Daryl Urig:

Interview & Bio: http://www.darylurig.com/about-daryl-urig.aspx

American Oil Painter Daryl Urig is a member of The Portrait Society of America, Oil Painters of America and Cincinnati Art Club. He has teaches at the University of Cincinnati for over 9 years and is president of Total Media Source Inc.

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Forgotten Tractors – Original Oil Painting Blog by American Oil Painter Daryl Urig

I had a great weekend of plein air painting at Lake Waynoka in Sardinia, OH. I enjoyed conversing with my hosts, Tom and Donna, and the other painters while painting various pieces, even though I didn’t sell any of my work. The weekend was supposed to provide artists with a forum in which to sell their paintings, but the event was not planned out well enough to interest serious collectors. Like most events comparable to this one, it didn’t help the artists sell their work, but it was a great time.

The image shown below is “Forgotten Tractors” in Russellville Ohio. It’s an 11” x 17” painting on a gallery wrapped frame. I think the yellow light and subtle colors of the wood on the barn contrast the richly red tractor with bright headlights that sits forgotten in the doorway of the barn. For this piece, color was most important. And the color shifts in large areas helped keep the piece exciting.

To view more paintings
Recent work: http://www.darylurig.com/2010-paintings.aspx
Blog:  http://DarylUrig.com/blog
Website: http://DarylUrig.com

Purchase:
Price: Contact: Robyn@DarylUrig.com

American Oil Painter Daryl Urig is a member of The Portrait Society of America, Oil Painters of America and Cincinnati Art Club. He has taught at the University of Cincinnati for over 9 years and is president of Total Media Source Inc.

View his Exhibit and Awards by clicking here.

Subscribe to Daryl Urig’s “The Adventure of an American Oil Painter” Blog by Email

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nude reclining – sketch group – Original Oil Painting Blog by American Oil Painter Daryl Urig

8 x 10 inches, oil on canvas

I wanted my rendering to capture the simplicity and cascading lighting in this image while remaining sensitive to the subtle color changes in the model’s skin. I decided to capture the light and dark pattern and color changes in a beveled form. Although I made the painting of the figure more linear, it was the atmosphere that I created that held the painting together by merging the figure and background.

© 2010 Daryl Urig, All Rights Reserved

To view more paintings:
Recent work: http://www.darylurig.com/2010-paintings.aspx
Blog:  http://DarylUrig.com/blog
Website: http://DarylUrig.com

Enlist Urig for your next Historic Event Painting: http://www.darylurig.com/historic-event-oil-painting.aspx

More on Daryl Urig:
Interview & Bio: http://www.darylurig.com/about-daryl-urig.aspx

Purchase:
Price: Contact: Robyn@DarylUrig.com

American Oil Painter Daryl Urig is a member of The Portrait Society of America, Oil Painters of America and Cincinnati Art Club. He has taught at the University of Cincinnati for over 8 years and is president of Total Media Source Inc.

View his Exhibit and Awards by clicking here.

Subscribe to Daryl Urig’s “The Adventure of an American Oil Painter” Blog by Email

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The “Starving Artist” is not a stereotype – Original Oil Painting Blog by American Oil Painter Daryl Urig

Artists spend their lives searching for praise and appreciation for their work. Most don’t ever find it. For some, it comes posthumously. For the lucky few, they find it within their lifetime.

The point is: most artists spend their lives struggling. Although people admire their work and devotion to their craft, they seem to have little respect for the artist themselves.

Most people get steady jobs after they finish high school and college. For them, their career is only a means to sustain their family’s lives. But for an artist, their work is their life’s passion. Unfortunately, artists don’t always enjoy the steady stream of income that those who take corporate jobs do.

Whether it’s their lower income or lack of steady work, artists find themselves under-appreciated in the corporate world. Although museums, festivals and galleries showcase their work, the artist rarely profits, both personally and professionally.

When one thinks of art, only some names come to mind: Monet, Picasso, Da Vinci and Michelangelo, to name a few. Although each of these artists achieved notoriety (some posthumously) with their work, they struggled.

Monet’s famous piece, “Women in the Garden” (1866-67), took him about two years to finish. The canvas was 2.5 meters tall, and in order to paint the entire piece outside, he dug a trench in his garden and devised a pulley system to lower and raise the canvas. Although he labored over this piece for years, the Academie de Beaux-Arts denied the painting’s entrance to the Salon (art exhibit) of 1867. The Academie’s denial of his painting devastated Monet, as he had devoted a huge amount of time, money and energy to this piece.

Instead of changing his work to suit the Academie, Monet, along with other artists, seceded from the mainstream artistic community (the Academie) and founded the Impressionists. These men gained the acclaim that all artists desire, but only after a period of struggle.

The subjectivity of art, as evidenced by Monet’s clash with the Academie, is a big part of why artists struggle. By the nature of their work, artists are slaves to the likes of the consumer and viewer. Choosing to conform to the wants of the consumers can benefit the artist, but even if their work is “en vogue,” they still seem to financially struggle.

Although artists are the ones who preserve and enhance the culture of towns, cities and countries, they’re highly under-appreciated. If the everyday businessman or woman can make a steady income, why can’t the everyday artist?

…Maybe their pursuit of a career that they love is comparable to a monetary reward?

But I think that’s just a cop-out!


© 2010 Daryl Urig, All Rights Reserved

To view more paintings:
Recent work: http://www.darylurig.com/2010-paintings.aspx
Blog:  http://DarylUrig.com/blog
Website: http://DarylUrig.com

Enlist Urig for your next Historic Event Painting: http://www.darylurig.com/historic-event-oil-painting.aspx

More on Daryl Urig:
Interview & Bio: http://www.darylurig.com/about-daryl-urig.aspx

Purchase:
Price: Contact: Robyn@DarylUrig.com

American Oil Painter Daryl Urig is a member of The Portrait Society of America, Oil Painters of America and Cincinnati Art Club. He has taught at the University of Cincinnati for over 8 years and is president of Total Media Source Inc.

View his Exhibit and Awards by clicking here.

Subscribe to Daryl Urig’s “The Adventure of an American Oil Painter” Blog by Email

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A place in Art History – Original Oil Painting Blog by American Oil Painter Daryl Urig

I wanted to provide admirers of my artwork with the opportunity to become part of my work and legacy. By joining me in my creative process, my collectors and I will forge a place for ourselves in Art History.

I have offered to paint at twelve private events for the remainder of 2010. I will create a unique painting at each of these special occasions, drawing upon my impressions of the affair.

For more information about this service, please look here.


© 2010 Daryl Urig, All Rights Reserved

To view more paintings:
Recent work: http://www.darylurig.com/2010-paintings.aspx
Blog:  http://DarylUrig.com/blog
Website: http://DarylUrig.com

Enlist Urig for your next Historic Event Painting: http://www.darylurig.com/historic-event-oil-painting.aspx

More on Daryl Urig:
Interview & Bio: http://www.darylurig.com/about-daryl-urig.aspx

Purchase:
Store: http://www.darylurig.com/store.html
Price: Contact: Robyn@DarylUrig.com

American Oil Painter Daryl Urig is a member of The Portrait Society of America, Oil Painters of America and Cincinnati Art Club. He has taught at the University of Cincinnati for over 8 years and is president of Total Media Source Inc.

View his Exhibit and Awards by clicking here.

Subscribe to Daryl Urig’s “The Adventure of an American Oil Painter” Blog by Email

Add      to Technorati Favorites

The Old Water Tower – Original Oil Painting Blog by American Oil Painter Daryl Urig


The Old Water Tower
on 5355 Miami Road in the Village of Indian Hill, Ohio
Oil on Canvas, 11 x 14 inches


It was only when I started painting that I realized the large size of the old water tower in Indian Hill. In addition to that, the light at the time of my plein air session lit up both the top of the tower and the ground beneath it. Although this created a beautiful effect, it made capturing the image more difficult. I think I ultimately achieved the lighting effect and showed the grand nature of the tower in my piece, but not without some alterations of my original rendering.

While painting outside, I especially enjoyed completing the top section and cloud portions of the piece. But upon arriving at the studio with my initial rendering, I noticed that the bottom of the painting did not fit with the top section. After noticing this, I repainted the bottom portion based on both my memory of my plein air session and the photograph I took of the location.

Like most of my paintings, I learned a lot from this piece.

© 2010 Daryl Urig, All Rights Reserved

To view more paintings:
Recent work: http://www.darylurig.com/2010-paintings.aspx
Blog:  http://DarylUrig.com/blog
Website: http://DarylUrig.com

Enlist Urig for your next Historic Event Painting: http://www.darylurig.com/historic-event-oil-painting.aspx

More on Daryl Urig:
Interview & Bio: http://www.darylurig.com/about-daryl-urig.aspx

Purchase:
Store: http://www.darylurig.com/store.html
Price: Contact: Robyn@DarylUrig.com

American Oil Painter Daryl Urig is a member of The Portrait Society of America, Oil Painters of America and Cincinnati Art Club. He has taught at the University of Cincinnati for over 8 years and is president of Total Media Source Inc.

View his Exhibit and Awards by clicking here.

Subscribe to Daryl Urig’s “The Adventure of an American Oil Painter” Blog by Email

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3 Sketches from Cincinnati Art Club – Studio – Original Oil Painting Blog by American Oil Painter Daryl Urig

These are three sketches I completed with a long hair filbert brush at the Cincinnati Art Club. The filbert brush was a departure from the pallet knives I’ve used over the last few years. Pallet knives taught me to simplify and match the color I wanted. I attempted to use the same technique with the brush, and I was pleased with the results.

The first piece, Claire, is an 8 x 10 inch painting on canvas. The softness of the brush’s bristles make the edges of the painting less clear, especially in comparison to the lines created by the pallet knife. Nonetheless, I think there are good separations of the painted model, which adds great form to the image.

The second piece, Lost in an Empty Room, is an 11 x 14 inch oil painting on canvas. The disparity of the lonely, half-naked model in an empty room intrigued me. The light and exit through the door is clear due to the use of the filbert brush. The hard beveling form of her face dramatizes the image, emphasizing her age and despair.

The third piece, Construction Man, is an 11 x 14 inch oil painting on canvas. The loose brushwork and softness of the color changes add richness to the painting, especially in the forward forearm. The manner in which I painted this gives the viewer a strong spatial contrast. Also, the loose brushwork and color choice of the paint on the construction worker’s apron helps arrange the spatial order of the piece. Again, the strong beveling of the face’s form adds focus to it, even though it’s loosely indicated.

To view more paintings:
Recent work: http://www.darylurig.com/2010-paintings.aspx
Blog:  http://DarylUrig.com/blog
Website: http://DarylUrig.com

More on Daryl Urig:
Interview & Bio: http://www.darylurig.com/about-daryl-urig.aspx

Purchase:
Store: http://www.darylurig.com/store.html
Price: Contact: Robyn@DarylUrig.com

American Oil Painter Daryl Urig is a member of The Portrait Society of America, Oil Painters of America and Cincinnati Art Club. He has taught at the University of Cincinnati for over 8 years and is president of Total Media Source Inc.

View his Exhibit and Awards by clicking here.

Subscribe to Daryl Urig’s “The Adventure of an American Oil Painter” Blog by Email

Add    to Technorati Favorites