We are privileged

Reflecting over the life we all are privileged to live. Each of us unknowingly enjoying the creative benefits of those who came before us that contributed to our “life”. Who fought for our freedom, made the journey to America’s, invented electricity, a Christmas song, thought of a Nutcracker, painted the painting “Starry Night”. So many creative inventions to make our life better, safer, more enjoyable, warmer in winter, we have so much to appreciate each day of our life. Donald Deskey invented plywood, who invented the 2 x 4” to build our homes with? Disney gave us Mickey Mouse. The list goes on and on.

Makes you think, what will I be able to contribute to this great thing we call life.

What do you appreciate? What do you want to do?

A Great Day at the Marina 2

I receive great enjoyment from painting plein air at the marina. Some of the boat owners may not enjoyed the Mayflies as they tried to clean their boats, but this was of no consequence to me since I was focusing more on the big picture (no pun intended).

Painting plein air sets the pace of the painting. Painting Knives seem to help me lay down large amounts of color quickly though you do not want to rush or hurry any of your decisions, but you must be able to get your overall impression of light down as quickly as you can, because we all know that light changes. I wanted to have a focus on the main boat and let everything else fall off into my peripheral vision of my eye. Color temperature and light are very important to me, but my primary concern is to make you feel the brightness of the light as it glared off those beautiful boats. The brightness of the boats in the sunlight adding to my eyes not being able to see all the detail around my center focus, but more like abstract shapes of color all blurring together, trying to form some other objects around me.

I met a very nice gentleman that day, Todd Schweitzer whom ended up being the owner of the boat I was painting and we seem to be on the same conversational page and enjoyed talking for some time. You can see him standing next to the almost finished painting, not wearing a shirt. View I was painting was behind him.

When I got back to the studio I could begin seeing what was lacking in the painting, and using some reference shots I was able to make a few adjustments that benefited the painting. I had not been able to paint from my Mac Computer before, but this seemed to be the perfect solution on this particular day.

Plein Air Painting Knives Workshops – Click Here

Great Day at the Marina 2, Oil on Panel, 11 x 14 inches

© 2011 Daryl Urig

Moonlit Night – Using Photoshop to help with your grey tones #1

This painting was taken from a photo I had taken that inspired me. I am including it in my Urban painting series and want to use this painting to explore the massing together of similar shapes and tones in a composition. It is amazing how few shapes and tones we need to really depict a painting. Unifying shapes gives a stronger simpler appeal to the painting by allowing more tones to run into each other unifying the whole painting. It is then much quicker for the eye to read and understand.

Moonlit Night, 12 x 16 inches, oil on canvas


To accomplish this I used the aid of the computer and my knowledge of PhotoShop. Using PhotoShop for about 15 years and teaching it at the University of Cincinnati for over 9 years gives me a lot of experience with the program. I took the image and made it grayscale. Then I adjusted the tones under the levels to provide the tonal range I was looking for in the painting. Then under posterize I wanted to simplify the image to about 4 overall tones. To get an image that still resembled the model I set posterize between 16 and 18. Adjusting it a little more or less you could see the forms it accentuated. I did not want to generalize to loose form but to enhance it.

I then went back to the color image and adjusted it to match the tones in the gray scale image but I did not posterize it.

I then printed out a black and white on my laser printer and the other in color on my color printer.

I began developing a tonal image in blue grays and slightly warmer grays to give variety to the under painting. The gray posterized image gave me a good start in separating and generalizing tone. I was trying to keep it to about 4 tones. Working and reworking I was able to get my tones to just these 4 now having moved from the image to only the painting. The image did not dictate the tones it eventually came down to me to make all final decisions. Using my knowledge of anatomy and conceived forms (See conceived forms video) I was able to represent forms that had volume and felt natural.

(Continued on my next blog post)

Workshop: How to use the Digital Image in paining, See workshop page of website

At Peace – Mother Nursing – Jan. 18, 2010 – Original Oil Painting Blog by American Oil Painter Daryl Urig

At Peace – Mother Nursing – Jan. 18, 2010
Original Oil Painting Blog by American Oil Painter Daryl Urig.
24 x 20 inches, oil on canvas

To view more paintings
Recent work: http://www.darylurig.com/2010-paintings.aspx
Blog:  http://DarylUrig.com/blog
Website: http://DarylUrig.com

Price: Contact: Robyn@DarylUrig.com

American Oil Painter Daryl Urig is a member of The Portrait Society of America, Oil Painters of America and Cincinnati Art Club. He has taught at the University of Cincinnati for over 8 years and is president of Total Media Source Inc.

View his Exhibit and Awards by clicking here.

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We gain Empirical Knowledge through our struggles as a painter – Jan. 7, 2010 – Original Oil Painting Blog by American Oil Painter Daryl Urig

John Carlson, renowned painter and instructor, understood the painter’s quest for empirical knowledge in his artwork. He said, “Art is the transmittable, personal impression of one quality in the quality before us.” Carlson also states that painting is, “…an accumulation of experiences and consequently accumulation of emotions, transmuted in time into a general or universal emotion from which all specific emotions draw their life-blood.”

I can feel these transmuted emotions in my spirit. I understand that what I’m expressing in paint is greater than whatever I’m painting. The image is an amalgamation of my emotions, my observations and my memories.

Carlson declared that “too much reality in a picture is always a disappointment to the imaginative souls. We love suggestions not hard facts.”

By recreating your imagination in paint, you can visualize your thoughts and emotions. Painting is personal, as it allows us as individuals to interpret what’s around us. My psychologist friend tells me that artists see everything by how it affects them. This becomes evident in their work.

In toiling and struggling, we find our inspiration and create art. Through our experiments and experiences, we experience failure and success. For artist to gain some unique self-expression in paint, our failures may outweigh our successes.

To view more paintings visit http://DarylUrig.com/blog or http://DarylUrig.com

For Sale/Price: Contact: Robyn@DarylUrig.com

American Oil Painter Daryl Urig is a member of The Portrait Society of America, Oil Painters of America and Cincinnati Art Club. He has taught at the University of Cincinnati for over 8 years and is president of Total Media Source Inc.

View his Exhibit and Awards by clicking here.

Subscribe to Daryl Urig’s “The Adventure of an American Oil Painter” Blog by Email

Add to Technorati Favorites

Self-Portrait in Woods – Nov. 9, 2009 – Original Oil Painting Blog by American Oil Painter Daryl Urig

Self-Portrait in the Woods – Nov. 9, 2009

A Daily Painter – A Painting A Week
Original Oil Painting Blog by American Oil Painter Daryl Urig.
11 x 14 inches, oil on Canvas
To view more paintings visit http://DarylUrig.com/blog or http://DarylUrig.com

For Sale/Price: Contact: Robyn@DarylUrig.com

American Oil Painter Daryl Urig is a member of The Portrait Society of America, Oil Painters of America and Cincinnati Art Club. He has taught at the University of Cincinnati for over 8 years and is president of Total Media Source Inc.

View his Exhibit and Awards by clicking here.

Subscribe to Daryl Urig’s “The Adventure of an American Oil Painter” Blog by Email

Add to Technorati Favorites

Earning an income from your exhibitions, even nationally juried exhibitions: Ask Questions and be informed.

Tony Moffit’s Blog talks about the simplified Art Gallery Math to determine your income projection for the year. However, I feel my experiences have made me come up with deeper questions and considerations, concerning an artist’s income.

A huge problem I have is that a lot of the shows I enter seem to be more concerned with vanity than sales. Thus, I’ve learned to ask galleries who want to show my work the following questions:

1) When was the last time your gallery sold a piece? Their answers are often surprising.

2) What is the price range in which your artwork typically sells? This can help with what pieces you choose to show.

3) Will they promote you and to whom? They often have outdated lists. Sometimes they want you to provide them with a list of names.

4) What does the opening reception entail? One of the biggest surprises I’ve had is when a gallery asked me if I would bring something.

One nationally juried show curator yelled at me when I wanted to be informed. She told me that she’s been in nationally juried shows for ten years and has never sold a piece. Sometimes there are even greater surprises!

But the point is, it’s in the artists best interest to ask questions and be informed. Artist must take the reins of their own career, instead of relying on others for success.