9 x 12 in. Oil Painting Studies Sale

I am making more room in my studio by having a 9 x 12 inch oil painting studies paintings sale for $225 each. Hundreds of paintings from my plein air and workshop tour, my books and more. I need the room, so all paintings are on a first come first serve basis. Starting August 27th till August 31st 2018 at my studio in Springdale Ohio, inside of Cincinnati, or online. Includes free shipping inside USA. Call 513.708.7981 to let me know you are coming to studio or for purchases.  It is a great time to change your decor and own an original oil painting.

Studies show the bare bones of creativity as the artist develops his craft. They are essential for the artist to learn, grow and develop.

2 is a pair
Lighthouse, Light Station?
Utah, Zion National Park and Hudoo’s
Gorman Heritage Farm
Ohio Rural plein air studies
Murray’s husbands’ boat, fresh paint
Seaside Pareidola Studies
Figurative Studies on Beach
Anything can be art studies
Spring Island Workshop Still Life Demo Study
Low Country Marsh Studies at dawning light
Captain Benton, SC portrait

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

More meditative thoughts in fine arts oil painting

Crazy painting day for me today, second painting today. I have been germinating this idea in my head for a while during prayer and meditation. Remember Moses and the sign of healing on his staff or the sign for medicine? Healing power, 18 x 28 in, oil on panel. I learned a lot painting this painting. Painting imagery out of mind without over-elaborating or providing more definition than envisioned or more of an impression. The looseness that it was painted has opened up many more ideas for painting exploration.

Healing Power, 18 x 24 in.
Healing Power, 18 x 24 in.

 

 

 

 

“Flying Dreamer” painting, highlighted in Apil/May 2018, International Artist Magazine, paint what you see, don’t fill in the blanks, my impressions are fragmented at best. It is not like seeing a photo where everything is there in detail and relationship to each other.

Flying Dreamer, 48 x 24 in
Flying Dreamer, 48 x 24 in

Being part of the universal fabric, 30 x 24 in. Oil on panel. When we allow God to include us with his divine plan we become part of the universal fabric that weaves beyond all space, dimensions and time. More than our mind can comprehend.

Universal Fabric, 30 x 24 in.
Universal Fabric, 30 x 24 in.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It has always been my intention when painting to not only paint the physical. I desire to include the spiritual or other nonvisual dimensions of life. For instance, think about all of the emotions you feel in one day. What would that look like? Now think about the spiritual dimension, what will that look like? Challenging. It is more like a life force flowing from the invisible to the visible all at once. Like the breath of life flowing through the atoms of your body.

Strong Woman

Strong Woman, 30w x 24, Oil on Panel

This is very different for me. This started from a very abstract sketch that I put away about one year ago. I saw it and wanted to do an abstract painting from it. The painting and style emerged as I worked on it very carefully and directly painting each stroke.It may have some Picasso (who I loved has work from childhood) and Cezanne influence. So funny coming back to this now. As a child so many of the ideas I wanted to paint I did not have the skills to accomplish. I remember huge amounts of frustration.

Updated Gallery to represent larger scope and selection of paintings

Cincopa WordPress plugin

Call/Text: 513-708-7981 or Email: contact@DarylUrig.com
To reserve your original Oil Painting by Daryl Urig

Let us all get back into the act of living by developing our culture

I hear more about things, things, and more things. Let us all try to enrich our life, culture and those around us with good conversations. Think for our self. Believe in something. Do something selfless. Honor the law of doing good. Develop rich family customs that bring with them good memories. Learn to appreciate art. Choose habits that others would be delighted to follow. Leave something positive for the next generation. Let us all get back into the act of living. Then see the great outcome this has on our society.

The Arts - Culture, 30 x 24 inches, oil on panel
The Arts – Culture, 30 x 24 inches, oil on panel – Pareidolia

Setting better goals for the 2016 fine arts painter

  1. If you thought about painting, now is the time to begin
  2. Keep painting fun
  3. Paint with purpose
  4. Have a clear message
  5. Engage the viewer
  6. Paint your own idea
  7. Find answers to gaps in your learning
  8. Allow your personality to show through in each new painting
  9. Believe in yourself
  10. Get rid of any self-doubt
  11. Stop worrying
  12. Focus on what new things you want to achieve
  13. Find something you like about 10% of each painting
  14. Look for an instructor different than yourself
  15. Work ridiculously hard
  16. Be practical
  17. Take chances
  18. Reach out to a wider audience of collectors
  19. Paint what you enjoy
  20. Master the art of selling paintings

What would consider adding to this list?

I have filled my gallery at the Creative Underground with many of my painting experiences. I would enjoy having you stop in for a visit. Please call or text before you come.

You may enjoy starting a painting class with me on Tuesday evenings from 5:30 to 8pm. please contact me below:

Call/Text: 513-708-7981
Email: contact@DarylUrig.com
Website: www.DarylUrig.com

My New Online Gallery

My new Online Gallery is available for viewing

Please text/call to receive up to date pricing: 513-708-7981

Cincopa WordPress plugin

Who?

Norman Schnepf, Art Teacher, Avon Lake High School

If you graduated with me from Avon Lake High School, in Avon Lake, Ohio, you may not remember this gentleman. Even if you went to the school you probably would not see him unless you took an art class. Then be lucky enough to draw him as your instructor. If you played basketball you probably did not notice him behind the table keeping score, year after year.

His name was Norman Schnepf, my art teacher. Probably my most influential art instructor. He was quiet. He would offer up suggestions only if you asked him for his guidance. I asked, and he provided my aching art heart creative food for thought. If it was not for his direction back then I would no doubt be as far along as I am today.

 

Cloud Formation, 34 w x 12 inches H, Oil on Panel, 2015

In his class he taught me about design. He loved abstraction and was eager to share his insights to an open mind. We could explore many tools, and this is where I first came in contact with the painting knife, my primary painting tool today. I am just beginning to turn the corner and returning to some abstract painting.

After I went to my first year of art school I returned to his class to share what I learned. One student did follow me to my college. Years later I thought of him. When I Googled his name I was sorry to learn that he had past. I had wanted to thank him again for the foundation he had helped me lay in painting.

An update to my faithful blog followers

To my faithful followers that have signed up on my website blog “the Adventures of an American Oil Painter”. Thank you, it has been a very busy and challenging time.

I have so many thoughts going on in my head. Not having time to express them in a painting is very frustrating for me. Today I was able to get outside in the warm sun and finally paint a landscape viewed from my studio. Painting and tennis are very important emotional outlets for me.

This may be a little jumbled and informative so just hang in with me for a minute or two.

I’ve been finished constructing my studio. Many you have followed and seen the progress. I recently finished my desk and my “Wall of Paintings”. I have too many paintings to count and not enough frames or wall space to hang them. I designed a compact display system; this seems to be working out well. Still working on the lighting for these beautiful paintings. All of my paintings are part of my Holiday Celebration Exhibition, December 7, 8 and 9, 2015, from 10 am till 4 pm. Stop in and enjoy a glass of wine with me and peruse 100’s of paintings at friendly holiday pricing.

I never understood how having space for a gallery would affect me. It’s fun when all the paintings are displayed together. You can begin to see distinct character that is developing in your painting style. We are always learning and growing, as painters, otherwise it would not be any fun. What kinds of notions, ideas or subject matter you are drawn to. You see them popping up consistently in various paintings. It can be very encouraging and enlightening to the painter.

Over the last two or three months I have been developing two paintings, as I mentioned earlier. An abstract landscape of sky and clouds, much of this was the accomplished primarily in my head. The second is a figurative painting of a female practicing Yoga. Working with sketches, photos and painting color studies while carefully describing shapes to make an interesting representation. I cannot wait to get fully immersed in both of these developing paintings.

I am leaving in a few days for South Carolina and will be there for three weeks.

Forgot, remodeled our kitchen.

Did I mention Dan McCaw? He is a fabulous oil painter. I love his work. We have been working on a video together discussing his painting. This hopefully will be completed shortly and will be available for viewing at Daryl Urig’s Creative Underground; you also may freely view many other painter interviews at www.DUCreativeUnderground.com.

I just love what I am doing and have so much passion for it. I want to share my enthusiasm with you. In January, on the 12, 13 and 14th, 2016, I will be hosting a workshop for beginning to intermediate painters called “Get Back into Art – Finding a Creative Outlet” at my Creative Underground Studio. Please see details on my website.

Hope to see you soon.

I loved my Grandpa – The Paint Brush vs. the Painting Knife

I have such fond memories of my grandpa. He died young when I was either 7 or 8 years old. He was what I wanted to be when I grew up. He loved children. As a child that felt wonderful. Though my father embodied this statement as well, he did not spend time with me as Grandpa did. I remember “Pa”, that is what we called him. He taught me to play my toy xylophone. We built a model of two black bears. We glued the pieces together and then carefully painted them. We also built a wooden stagecoach model. I valued and treasured each experience like a gift that I kept for years. He instructed me in the value of “The Nurseryman” which he was, by germinating orange seeds in our refrigerator. Seeing them sprout we nurtured the seedlings into trees. We had so many small trees. Year’s later in the tenth grade metal shop class I built a large sheet metal pot to house one final selected tree. I kept this tree for probably 25 more years when it died. Pa seemed to have no limits. He was engaged with his grandchildren and I loved him for it.

When I got my chance with my granddaughter this past year I knew what to do. I cannot tell you how fulfilling this is for me. Passing on what I learned from a great man.

Happy Grandpa, 18 x 24 inches, oil on panel

The Paint Brush vs. the Painting Knife

I have been working on this painting “Happy Grandpa” this last week using a paintbrush. I know that using a brush may not be surprising since that is what most painters use. Though for the past 9 years I have been painting solely with a painting knife. Some like to call it a pallet knife others a trowel since it is so large and resembles a cement trowel. I used a Robert Simons No. 8 Signet, 3/4 inch Rosemary & Co. Series 303 and No. 6 Ivory Rigger brushes.

One of the reasons I hated using a paintbrush in the past and began to favor the Painting Knife was because of the nuisance and time wasting effort needed in washing them out with turpentine.  As many of you know I paint with M. Graham Oil Paints that are made with Walnut Oil for the last 9 years.  No more smelly turpentine’s, I don’t care if they call them odorless or not, I can still smell them, and they give me a headache.

With this brush painting I made use of my paper towels to pull the unwanted paint from my brush. I learned this from years of painting with a Painting Knife. If I need a cleaner brush, I lay it in some Walnut Oil and then pull out the unwanted pigment with a paper towel or rag. This is definitely an added benefit and convenience of brush painting with M. Graham Walnut Oil. Then wash it in Murphy Oil Soap when I am ready to stop painting for the day. I form the bristles of the brush to keep its shape and air-dry it.

Still, when it comes to being expedient a knife is the way to go. If you want softer edges and a little more hassle we always have artist paint brushes.