Drawing the figure

It seems that this approach is a very good way to keep looking at the bigger picture without getting caught up with too much detail initially in a drawing. If you are struggling with this, than this approach may be for you.

You are at all times relating to the whole so you most probably won’t end up with misaligned proportions.

Don’t rush into a painting – Treat it like a gourmet meal

Don’t rush into a painting, but first take time to think about your painting before diving in. A painting should be like a gourmet meal, says Richard Schmid, you would not just gobble it down. Savor your time.

Below is taken from his book: Alla Prima: Everything I Know About Painting by Richard Schmid

If you are happy with your subject and there are no mysteries about it remaining in your mind, do a simple analysis of what is in front of you. It is not enough to see what color eyes the model has and then start. Before you begin any painting, have a clear grasp of the distribution of light on the subject. Notice its overall direction (that’s easy), and its temperature, which is sometimes not so easy. Start by asking yourself critical questions such as the following:

1.  Which side of the subject is lightest or darkest? This may seem simple, but in landscape painting, it is not always obvious.

2.  Is the light clear and sharp or diffused? Are there strong cast shadows or are the darks softly modeled? Look at the edges of the shadows for that, bright light by itself will not necessarily produce hard edges. Is there any strong reflected light bouncing around?

3.  Where are the lightest light areas, the darkest darks, the sharpest edges, the completely “lost” edges? This is particularly important in establishing the range of values and edges in a painting.

4.  How warm or cool is the light? Are the shadows warmer or cooler than the light areas on the subject?

5. Where are the most powerful colors? What are they?

6.  Is there an obvious color harmony in the subject as a whole, or is the harmony subtle, as in daylight? Is the harmony created by the light amplified by related local colors in the subject? (This happens with snow and water and fields of grass.)

7.  What sort of technique do you envision? How do you want to put your paint on? Are you going to use a broken color rendering, or strong fluid brushwork, or something else? Do you intend a thickly painted rendering or thin? Where are you going to shovel the paint on, and where do you want to keep it thin?

8. Where are the strong simple areas, and where do you have to be especially careful?

9.  Are there any drawing problems? Is there foreshortening to contend with? Are there perspective distortions, or areas of ambiguity or confusion? Is there anything in the subject that would look weird if painted?

10. Is there good light on your canvas? Is the light going to change?

11.Are you going to have a problem with glare on your canvas? If so, how are you going to deal with it?

12. Is the subject going to change? What are you going to do about that?

13.Lastly (as if all of that weren’t enough), consider how much of what you are looking at you really need to paint, or want to paint, or have time to paint.

The actual business of painting unfolds as a stroke-by-stroke process, and every work demands countless unpredictable decisions made along the way. Nevertheless, and like it or not, all of those transient decisions will be governed by the few crucial choices and observations made at the start. There really aren’t that many, and with experience and discipline you will be able to take them all in with a few quick glances. It will become second nature to you-like checking to see if your more vital buttons are buttoned before you go out. After all, you can’t stand around talking to yourself all day, there is a painting to be done!

My sister Viv

Many of you may not know that my sister died from cancer this past year. It was very hard for me since we were close my whole life. She was my older sister, and always took an interest in me.

I have fond memories of her as a child. She was a flower child, straight out of the 60’s, looking to change the world and make her own way.

She had a whole life before her, and it was cut short. I miss her often, and I always cry when I think of her.

Life without her is hard. I spent most of my vacations since childhood with her. But even in death, I learn from her. Her thirst for life makes me want to be better. But I am flawed, as I tend to retreat from the world when it becomes overly complicated.

I miss her words and encouragement as I face so many confusing odds in life. Just having her encouragement meant everything to me. I could certainly use it now.

Death of a loved one is so hard. The good you took for granted is gone. But for me, my sister will always be alive in my thoughts and visual memories.

© 2011 Daryl Urig, All Rights Reserved

Visit the Paintings of Daryl Urig Online Gallery Store: http://www.darylurig.com/store.html

To view more paintings:
Website: http://DarylUrig.com
Blog:  http://DarylUrig.com/blog

Enlist Urig for your next Historic Event Painting: http://www.darylurig.com/historic-event-oil-painting.aspx

Purchase:
Price: Contact: Robyn@DarylUrig.com

View Exhibits and Awards: click here

Subscribe to Urig’s Blog: “The Adventure of an American Oil Painter” Blog by Email

More on Daryl Urig:

Interview & Bio: http://www.darylurig.com/about-daryl-urig.aspx

American Oil Painter Daryl Urig is a member of The Portrait Society of America, Oil Painters of America and Cincinnati Art Club. He has teaches at the University of Cincinnati for over 9 years and is president of Total Media Source Inc.

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It is not just about painting pretty pictures

Most people think this is what art is about. But it is not. It is so much more.

Unfortunately many beautiful paintings are never seen, and most painters wait for someone to notice them.

All aspiring artists need to develop a brand and promote themselves continually through shows, workshops, exhibits, advertisements, business cards, flyers, email blasts, and websites blogs. Building a brand takes a lot of time away from the artist’s true passion: painting.

By tenaciously building a brand, an aspiring artist will eventually get noticed. Getting noticed is not easy, but if you love art, nothing is too small or large of a challenge for the determined artist to reach his dreams.

© 2010 Daryl Urig, All Rights Reserved

Visit the Paintings of Daryl Urig Online Gallery Store: http://www.darylurig.com/store.html

To view more paintings:
Website: http://DarylUrig.com
Blog:  http://DarylUrig.com/blog

Enlist Urig for your next Historic Event Painting: http://www.darylurig.com/historic-event-oil-painting.aspx

Purchase:
Price: Contact: Robyn@DarylUrig.com

View Exhibits and Awards: click here

Subscribe to Urig’s Blog: “The Adventure of an American Oil Painter” Blog by Email

More on Daryl Urig:

Interview & Bio: http://www.darylurig.com/about-daryl-urig.aspx

American Oil Painter Daryl Urig is a member of The Portrait Society of America, Oil Painters of America and Cincinnati Art Club. He has teaches at the University of Cincinnati for over 9 years and is president of Total Media Source Inc.

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Forgotten Tractors – Original Oil Painting Blog by American Oil Painter Daryl Urig

I had a great weekend of plein air painting at Lake Waynoka in Sardinia, OH. I enjoyed conversing with my hosts, Tom and Donna, and the other painters while painting various pieces, even though I didn’t sell any of my work. The weekend was supposed to provide artists with a forum in which to sell their paintings, but the event was not planned out well enough to interest serious collectors. Like most events comparable to this one, it didn’t help the artists sell their work, but it was a great time.

The image shown below is “Forgotten Tractors” in Russellville Ohio. It’s an 11” x 17” painting on a gallery wrapped frame. I think the yellow light and subtle colors of the wood on the barn contrast the richly red tractor with bright headlights that sits forgotten in the doorway of the barn. For this piece, color was most important. And the color shifts in large areas helped keep the piece exciting.

To view more paintings
Recent work: http://www.darylurig.com/2010-paintings.aspx
Blog:  http://DarylUrig.com/blog
Website: http://DarylUrig.com

Purchase:
Price: Contact: Robyn@DarylUrig.com

American Oil Painter Daryl Urig is a member of The Portrait Society of America, Oil Painters of America and Cincinnati Art Club. He has taught at the University of Cincinnati for over 9 years and is president of Total Media Source Inc.

View his Exhibit and Awards by clicking here.

Subscribe to Daryl Urig’s “The Adventure of an American Oil Painter” Blog by Email

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Old House (study) – Oct. 21, 2009 – Original Oil Painting Blog by American Oil Painter Daryl Urig

Old House (study) – Oct. 21, 2009

A Daily Painter – A Painting A Week
Original Oil Painting Blog by American Oil Painter Daryl Urig.
5 x 7 inches, oil on panal
To view more paintings visit http://DarylUrig.com/blog or http://DarylUrig.com

Price: Contact: Robyn@DarylUrig.com

American Oil Painter Daryl Urig is a member of The Portrait Society of America, Oil Painters of America and Cincinnati Art Club. He has taught at the University of Cincinnati for over 8 years and is president of Total Media Source Inc.

View his Exhibit and Awards by clicking here.

Subscribe to Daryl Urig’s “The Adventure of an American Oil Painter” Blog by Email

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Happiness– Aug. 28, 2009 – Original Oil Painting Blog by American Oil Painter Daryl Urig

Happiness – Aug.27, 2009
A Daily Painter – A Painting A Week
Original Oil Painting Blog by American Oil Painter Daryl Urig.
11 x 14 inches, oil on panel.
To view more paintings visit http://DarylUrig.com/blog or http://DarylUrig.com

Price: Contact us at: Robyn@DarylUrig.com

American Oil Painter Daryl Urig is a member of The Portrait Society of America, Oil Painters of America and Cincinnati Art Club. He has taught at the University of Cincinnati for over 8 years and is president of Total Media Source Inc.

View his Exhibit and Awards by clicking here.

Subscribe to Daryl Urig’s “The Adventure of an American Oil Painter” Blog by Email

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Repainting a painting for simplicity – Original Oil Painting Blog by American Oil Painter Daryl Urig

I’ve never returned to a finished painting and reworked it. But I had to do something about that skirt in “Cascade”. It’s a painting I really love of my wife, Robyn, but that skirt just did not fit its space.

In the midst of reading some inspiring books, like Robert Henri’s “The Art Spirit,” I decided to re-work this piece. (You can find the titles listed in the Workshops & Learning section of my website.)

Henri talks about how a dress must reflect the surface or anatomy under the dress by simplifying its composition. Somehow I didn’t do that in this piece, so I changed it, as you can see in this post in the before and after images.

Henri also discusses the need for simplicity. You shouldn’t change a line’s direction until you have to. You also shouldn’t change a color until something else dictates or commands you to. He also says, “Try to reduce everything you see to the utmost simplicity. That is, let nothing but the things which are of the utmost importance to you have any place.”

As I ventured on the road to simplicity, I realized I would have to alter my whole composition in order to make it better. So after I reworked the skirt, I had to simplify the top.

See an instructional video on repainting a head to finish a painting. Click Here

View his Exhibit and Awards by clicking here.

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McKenzi, Animal Portrait – Aug. 19, 2009 – Original Oil Painting Blog by American Oil Painter Daryl Urig

McKenzie, Animal Portrait – Aug.19, 2009
A Daily Painter – A Painting A Week
Original Oil Painting Blog by American Oil Painter Daryl Urig.
8 x 10 inches, oil on panel.
To view more paintings visit http://DarylUrig.com/blog or http://DarylUrig.com

Price: SOLD

American Oil Painter Daryl Urig is a member of The Portrait Society of America, Oil Painters of America and Cincinnati Art Club. He has taught at the University of Cincinnati for over 8 years and is president of Total Media Source Inc.

View his Exhibit and Awards by clicking here.

Subscribe to Daryl Urig’s “The Adventure of an American Oil Painter” Blog by Email

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The Upward Climb – June 24, 2009 – Original Oil Painting Blog by American Oil Painter Daryl Urig

Upward Climb – June 24, 2009
A Daily Painter – A Painting A Week
Original Oil Painting Blog by American Oil Painter Daryl Urig.
8 x 10 inches, oil on panel.
To view more paintings visit http://DarylUrig.com/blog or http://DarylUrig.com

Price: Contact: Robyn@DarylUrig.com

American Oil Painter Daryl Urig is a member of The Portrait Society of America, Oil Painters of America and Cincinnati Art Club. He has taught at the University of Cincinnati for over 8 years and is president of Total Media Source Inc.

View his Exhibit and Awards by clicking here.

Subscribe to Daryl Urig’s “The Adventure of an American Oil Painter” Blog by Email

Add to Technorati Favorites